Theory of Disorder

Theory of Disorder
Theory of Disorder

Every conducive political cum economic system owes its very existence to violence and instability. Before the inception of the state, life, according to Thomas Hobbes was nasty, brutish and short. As a result, there arose a need to organise.

This meant that most rights members of the society enjoyed would have to be given up because most of these rights promoted to the nasty, brutish and short nature of life. These rights were extreme in nature and could be said to be primitive. They included invasion and take over of land and property belonging to another group of people or even person, Capture and enforcing forceful labour on captives, turning prisoners of war to slaves, repraisal attacks, etc. At a stage, members of the society sought after a conducive, tolerant and peaceful way to coexist. This led to the birth of the state.

A conducive environment for coexistence was established out of a chaotic one. The theory of disorder characterizes the inate need for social order that resides in all human beings no matter how chaotic they may appear outwardly.

This society, having attained conduciveness, as time goes by needs a plunge into disorder which in itself will be a temporary plunge that the society will eventually come out of in a short time. This is necessary to remind the citizens of the dire effects of disorder thereby keeping them law abiding at all times. This will ensure the sustainability of the conducive state.

This theory holds firm on the fact that every human society needs disorder to grow, develop and sustain.